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  1. Item:MER-1250

    Off Work N°6, Drawing Review

    €13.00

    This magazine shows various drawings in black & white, printed on recycled paper. All drawings are anonymous.

    Off Work Drawing Review is an artwork in progress by Parcifal Neyt, published three times a year by MER. Paper Kunsthalle. www.brangel.com

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  2. Item:MER-1249

    Alphabet, Michel Mouffe

    €45.00

    The book Alphabet shows Michel Mouffe's early work, assambled at random. Mouffe (°1957, Belgium) is a painter who does not paint. His sculpted paintings are made up of many thin glaze layers each adding their own meaning and merging into an almost immaterial surface, a barrel full of possibilities. Mouffe creates breathing bodies with subtle bulges emerging from the interior of the cloth, which behaves as skin: at the same time a protective boundary and a vulnerable opening. A skin that contains and protects, but which is also a passage to the outside world.

    The title Alphabet naturally meant the basics of the work as it stood out for the years to come. They outlined the possibilities this would offer to all future works. The book is percieved as a conversation. Sometimes a monologue Michel Mouffe makes with himself, sometimes between him and Joel Benzakin. Alongside this conversation that is reproduced as a real conversation, full of silences and pauses, the work is shown on large scale.

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  3. Item:MER-1248

    Hands Of Time (Plein été), Johan De Wilde

    €39.00

    Five years on and the acclaimed Hands of Time has a sequel entitled Hands of Time – Plein été. The second part is an overview of drawings and other works from the period 2012 to 2017 and follows on seamlessly from the first.

    Johan De Wilde’s work seems, if ever that is possible, to have become even more intense and his drawing style to explore new layers.

    The drawings can be seen as the work of a human printer (man created the computer in his own image). They are built up like paintings: a labour-intensive process, layer upon layer of horizontal and vertical lines interwoven with a form, a figure. It is as if he is drawing the canvas on which he paints with his pencils.

    Johan De Wilde draws real time on a scale of 1:1. While his and our time slips by, lines appear, which is another reason why almost every drawing is given the title History + a number. Vita brevis, ars longa.

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  4. Item:MER-1246

    From nul to zero, Henk Peeters

    €39.00

    Henk Peeters (°1925, The Hague) was considered one of the most active members of the Dutch NUL movement. Together with other Dutch artists such as Jan Schoonhoven, Armando and Jan Hendrikse, he formed NUL in the 1960’s, which later joined the international movement ZERO. As a result of growing international contacts, Peeters initiated ‘Zero on Sea’, an art manifestation in the summer of 1965 on a pier in Scheveningen, including about 50 likeminded artists from over ten countries.
    Peeters’ work is closely inspired by daily life and natural phenomena. By using mass-produced clinical materials such as nylon and plastic and assimilating them through processes like fire, ice, snow and mist, he aims to reinitiate the viewer’s consciousness towards his environment.
    The artistic practice of Henk Peeters was known for its diversity in material and technique, going from burned canvasses to readymades bought in chainstores. Often these objects show a strong duality between being both tactile and untouchable. As the artist once said: “with my work, I have always wanted it to look just as fresh as if it was in the HEMA (the Dutch chain store). It must not be artified... I had no need for artistic cotton wool.”

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  5. Item:MER-1244

    MUSEUM II

    €39.00

    This richly illustrated book forms a catalogue of two consecutive years of exhibitions at the cultural centre of Strombeek, located near Brussels. Between 2014 and 2016 CC Strombeek realised five major exhibitions and solo presentations that raised broad subjects and shed new light upon how artists turn relevant content into speaking images. Amongst the projects were solo-exhibitions of Daniel Buren and Kimsooja; an expo on ecology and on the art of drawing; and a historical impression of Japanese Art.

    Next to an extended set of exhibition views, the book brings together a remarkable collection of accompanying essays by contemporary writers. New productions are elucidated by statements and reflections from the artists as almost ‘intimately whispered’ first-hand information.

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  6. Item:MER-1245

    RESONANCES I, FOOD

    €20.00

    This book, an "art book on food", is based on material gathered during RESONANCES I, an ad-hoc project organized by the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission at the occasion of the Universal Exhibition EXPO 15: Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life, held in Milan. 

    The material gathered during the festival has been deconstructed and reconstructed into a new narrative that evokes the need of considering food not only as a mere scientific, technical and commercial matter of fact but also as a social, cultural and political matter of concern.

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  7. Item:MER-1243

    Discuter la Peinture, Nikolaas Demoen

    €29.00

    This artist book accompanies the video installation by Nikolaas Demoen (1965) shown at Mu.ZEE, Oostende Belgium, during the spring and summer of 2017.

    Discuter la Peinture is an installation in which several prominent 20th century French philosophers discuss painting. The book, which contains video stills, paintings and texts by Hans Demeyer and Phillip Van den Bossche, forms an excellent addendum to the exhibition and simultaneously stands as a high-quality publication on its own.

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  8. Item:MER-1242

    The Object Isn't There, LP

    €17.00

    tracklist:
    A False Dawn (19:54)
    B Frozen Music (15:46)

    Release date: November, 2017
    Written, recorded, mixed in Camberwell and Camden, London, 2012-2016
    Design by Jeroen Wille

     

    With The Object Isn’t There UK guitar player and producer Jack Allett has made a deeply personal masterpiece based around cyclical guitar parts and electronic percussion. Playing like a half remembered fever dream with an aesthetic that is ragged, hypnotic and spacey, its two side-long pieces touch on minimalism, kraut-infused dub and euphoric dance floor optimism. As comfortable being played after Manuel Göttschings E2-E4 as right before a Terekke lo-fi house anthem, it is laced with the melancholy of an early morning post-rave comedown. Yet for all the references and name-checking, it’s a record that is hard to compare to anything else, past or present.

    This record is about – insofar as instrumental music need be about anything – hallucinations. The title The Object Isn’t There serves as a concise definition, derived from the quote “An hallucination is a strictly sensational form of consciousness, as good and true a sensation as if there were a real object there. The object happens to be not there, that is all.” (William James, The Principles Of Psychology, 1890)

    Having experienced constant tinnitus – a form of auditory hallucination – for the last 13 years, Jack has long questioned the distinction of something experienced as being either there or not-there.  Even if, strictly speaking, an hallucination is something that’s not there, if the reality of how it affects day-to-day existence is undeniable then to any extent that matters, it is there. But The Object Isn’t There is no tale of woe, nor simply a response to this one condition, and tinnitus need not be considered only as distressing or distracting.  Allett sees it merely as one example of many things in life that cross this uncertain terrain:

    There are obvious parallels here with the notion of active listening.  There is room for emotion too, particularly the kind of overwhelming, ­all-consuming emotion that, once it fades, is hard to believe was actually how you felt.  Essentially the music here is concerned with being overwhelmed by a sensation, never really being sure to what extent you are conjuring it up yourself, to what extent it exists independently of you, but ultimately deciding that it doesn’t much matter; the sensation itself was undeniable. — Jack Allett

    A swirling haze with a plenitude of sounds bobbing to it’s surface it’s a heartfelt masterpiece of pattern based hypnotism.

    Biography

    Jack Allett works as a producer in London and has been active for many years as an experimental guitar player, releasing a solo record on Blackest Rainbow and collaborating with UK avant-guitar player Cam Deas. The Object Isn’t There was written, recorded, and mixed in Camberwell and Camden, London, UK. 2012-2016.

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  9. Item:MER-1241

    The Spectrum Does, LP

    €17.00

    tracklist:
    A Explain Please (The Stars Are Listening) (24:07)
    B1 This Was The Only Spot That Was Green (3:16)
    B2 The Spectrum Does (18:28)

    Release Date: November, 2017
    Robbie Lee: flute, tarogato, melodica, great bass recorder, electronics, percussion
    Che Chen: violin, harmonium, bass recorder, tape machine, electronics, percussion
    Recorded & mixed by Robbie Lee
    Mastered by Jack Allett
    Design by Jeroen Wille


    On The Spectrum Does, New York avant-rock musicians Che Chen and Robbie Lee create three earthy and slow moving pieces, informed as much by various global folk traditions as they are by 20th century composition and improvisation. Their ‘anything goes’ approach to improvising leads to a sonic document that sounds raw, intense and freshly exciting. A wild and shambolic brew sounding like nothing else.

    Che Chen is musician and visual artist currently best known for his work with percussionist Rick Brown as 75 Dollar Bill. In the mid 2000s he formed this duo with composer and producer Robbie Lee, who at the time played with people like Baby Dee and Neil Hagerty. Their most concentrated period of activity is bookended by a first LP they self-released in 2008 called Begin & Continue! and this record, The Spectrum Does, which contains music recorded several years later. 

    On The Spectrum Does, both tackle a range of un­conven­tional instruments like bass recorders, Renaissance clarinet, glissando flute, tarogato, electrified violin, ultraslow recorders and custom modified tape machines. While their first LP documented their earliest, mostly acoustic improvisations, The Spectrum Does captures Che and Robbie after 5 or so years of meeting two or three times week and multiple tours around the country (a couple of times as a part of Jozef van Wissem’s band Heresy Of The Free Spirit). By now what was pulsing out of their little overdriven tube amps was even more electrified and warped. Sounds of unknown origin seem to bubble up to the surface, met by completely unique approaches to wind and string instruments.

    Much boundary pushing improvised music gets described as ‘outer limits’ but on The Spectrum Does, it seems much more right to say they explore the ‘inner limits’. It is deep listening music, but not minimalist; complex but not virtuosic. Dissonances intermingle with folk harmonies and rhythms. As with all of the music this duo made together, there’s a sort of shambolic-shamanic sensibility to it, but without a motive or explicit purpose. To be filed close to your Tony Conrad, Henry Flynt, Pelt, The Dead C records.

    Some words from the duo on The Spectrum Does

    Che Chen: The long improvisation that starts on the first side and spills onto the next was recorded live at a gig opening for Loren Connors and Suzanne Langille’s incredible band, Haunted House, at Issue Project Room in the Spring of 2011 (back when they were in the Can Factory space). I remembering it being a strong set, crashing out of the gate with Robbie’s tangled tarogato lines and my splintered violin stabs before careening onward with the kind of harnessed, intensity that one always hopes will appear when improvising… The recordings that make up the bulk of the second side were made in a dark and airless practice space in the back of the Glasslands, a now defunct DIY space in South Williamsburg. The sound is more insular, turned inward instead of exploding out like the live set, and is pretty representative of how single minded the explorations that made up our weekly “sessions” could be.

    Robbie Lee: These pieces have the feeling of field recording, capturing rehearsals in their best moments, so a sense of freedom is everywhere, the kind of freedom that can collapse at any moment. But they are also the result of years of a developing a very close language, specific to this duo alone. We originally began playing together as bass clarinet duos, and for a while as bass recorder duos. So even when we are playing radically different instruments, there’s still this very real feeling that neither of us know who’s generating which sound, in this floating cloud of vibration. This is partially because of Che’s use of tape machines, custom modified to loop and play at different speeds, to reiterate and regurgitate my sounds, and then his own as well. 

    Che Chen: Not long after the Issue show, things fell apart, as they often do, and I went off and spent a couple of years collaborating with people in the Japanese underground before woodshedding hard on the electric guitar and starting 75 Dollar Bill. Meanwhile, Robbie made another record of his idiosyncratic songs (this time as Creature Automatic) and seemed to be focusing his considerable knowledge and technique on getting really good at one of the more unassuming instruments in his toolbox, the open-holed flute. I didn’t listen to Spectrum during the 5 years it sat on the shelf, but hearing it now, I love the openness and spirit of adventure. All the angles we were working on seem well-represented. I hear the synthesis of all the hours we spent playing together, and of all the hours we spent listening to music, another important part of those times. I hear our commitment to creating a shared language, a framework for making music spontaneously in the moment. But most of all I hear two people finding their way, pushing and supporting each other in sound. 

    Biographies

    Visual artist and musician Che Chen lives and works in New York. Former music projects include True Primes, duos with Tetuzi Akiyama, Chie Mukai and Jozef van Wissem’s Heresy Of The Free Spirit (with Robbie Lee). Currently he plays with percussionist Rick Brown as 75 Dollar Bill.

    Robbie Lee is a musician, composer and producer also living in NYC. He has played with an eclectic group of improvisers and songwriters like Neil Hagerty & The Howling Hex, Baby Dee, Cass McCombs, Mary Halvorson and Talibam! He is also in Creature Automatic, Seaven Teares, and a new trio with Brian Chase and James Ilgenfritz. He runs the Telegraph Harp label with Elisha Wiesner.

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  10. Item:MER-1240

    The House of Our Fathers, Dirk Braeckman & Jan Lauwers

    €85.00

    This outstanding volume is the trace of an immersion by Dirk Braeckman in the performance The House of Our Fathers by Jan Lauwers & Needcompany at the Kunstfestspiele Herrenhausen, Hannover, 2013.
    The photographs having passed Braeckman's dark room, the images, often starting from the same negative, start to compose a universe beyond the event's registration.
    With the boldness of a painter sketching, Dirk Braeckman has set up a series of which this volume can be considered the opening dance.

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